EDUCAUSE 2017

I should probably be packing for EDUCAUSE 2017 at this point, but I’m going to blog instead.

Again, go back through the blog for my evergreen observations about the conference.  I’m really looking forward to this year though.  Philadelphia’s a great city for a conference, the conference center is great (although I hope they’ve improved the wayfinding signs since 2011, because they were very confusing back then). I love taking the train to a conference instead of flying (going to NERCOMP in Providence on the train was a treat as well.)  My standard trick of “find people you like to hear, and go to their presentations” worked so well I actually had to cull a few presentations because I had too many choices that way.  I have also found myself making actual appointments with friends and colleagues to make sure I see them (although I almost always find everyone I want to check in with at least once.)  I think I will have to eat dinner 6 times a day though to get to everyone I want to dine with.

If you’re somehow a fan of this blog or my Twitter or whatever, and we’ve never been formally introduced, please take the time to seek me out and say hi.  Certainly saying “I’m a big fan of your blog!” is a great way to break the ice and start a conversation!   I may drag you out to dinner or drinks with whomever I’m with, though, so be warned.   Also, keep in mind the big round lunch tables are a great way to meet people–follow up with someone from a presentation, someone you met briefly in the hallway, etc.  I also usually end up in the CIO lounge a bit, if only because of the high concentration of people I like to talk to, and I suggest you do the same.  I’ll be frequently Tweeting during the conference, and probably sharing my location when I’m somewhere I want company.  And if you’re trying to exercise and want to come out, please join us in the fun run Thursday morning (I’ll be in the slow group).

See many of you tomorrow!

Book Club–“Weapons of Math Destruction”, part 3

I’m going to go in a little different direction this week–less on personal reflections, and trying to more directly answer Bryan Alexander’s discussion questions from his post on this week’s readings.

Continue reading Book Club–“Weapons of Math Destruction”, part 3

Book Club–“Weapons of Math Destruction”, part 2

I’m still here.  Again, I’ll point you to Bryan Alexander’s summary of Chapters 2 and 3, and just add some personal reflections on what the chapters meant to me.

Continue reading Book Club–“Weapons of Math Destruction”, part 2

Book Club–“Weapons of Math Destruction” by Cathy O’Neil

I’m finally doing it.

I’m going to keep up with Bryan Alexander’s book club.  This one should be easy–I started reading this book over the summer after hearing O’Neil speak at NYSCIO.  I got about halfway through before vacation and the ensuing chaos of the start of the semester overwhelmed me; luckily the timing of the book club is such that I should be able to carve out a little time to read it.  I believe this is a critically important book for everyone in IT, higher education, or anyone whose life is affected by data (i.e., everyone.)  Bryan did an excellent job summarizing the introduction and first chapter, so there’s little point in me reiterating it verbatim; I’ll just add a few of my personal impressions.

Continue reading Book Club–“Weapons of Math Destruction” by Cathy O’Neil

Nostalgia

Feeling a little nostalgic as of late.  This is because of four things:

  1. I recently passed my one year anniversary at Baruch.  I didn’t really mark it at the time because I was on vacation.  But I’ve always thought it takes a calendar year to really experience and understand new things–especially in academia where the calendar gives us more structure than some other workplaces.  Facebook reminding me of my post on my last day working at Drew and my first day at Baruch also helped quite a bit, as well as LinkedIn reminding me (and several colleagues congratulating me there.)  One year to me is also when I have to stop calling myself “new”, with the commensurate set of expectations.
  2. Last night I went to a going away dinner for yet another of my work colleagues who have left Drew. There have been several who have left since the start of 2016, and the organization will need to rebuild.  I’m extremely happy for my colleagues who have left, and I am hopeful for those who remain, they are a great team and they will do well.  It was an interesting evening also because several other colleagues who left Drew were also there, and it was a group of people who hadn’t all been together in the same place in a long time, so that felt a bit nostalgic.
  3. I’m right now on a plane to Chicago, where my Frye class of 2006 is having a summit.  Frye was (still) the single most transformative event of my leadership journey, and I’m looking forward to getting together with many of my closest professional friends, and reflecting on the lessons Frye gave us.  It’s convenient that it happens right after my first year at a new job.
  4. It’s spring.  Rebirth and all that.

So I’m feeling a bit reflective and contemplative.  It’s a good time for me to take stock, and ready myself to continue to grow as an employee, professional, and leader.  I’m happy with what I’ve accomplished and yearning to do even more and do it better.  A good time to outfit my toolbox and practice my skills.

How do you refresh, reflect, and recharge?

EDUCAUSE 2016 Pre-Departure

Well, the time of year is upon us again:  The EDUCAUSE Annual Conference.  This time, as in 2013 and 2010, it is in Anaheim, California.  I’m finishing up this post from the airport, waiting for my flight to Anaheim.

Continue reading EDUCAUSE 2016 Pre-Departure

On the Occasion of my Semianniversary

October 11, 2016 marked six months of working as AVP of IT and Deputy CIO at Baruch College.  Tl;dr:  It’s been the hardest I’ve ever worked, and overall it’s been incredibly rewarding.  And I’m just getting started.

Continue reading On the Occasion of my Semianniversary

What I Learned in the Job Search

As I come up on my six month anniversary at my new job (surely that is worth blogging about, stay tuned) I’ve decided to dust off this post.  Parts of it date from nearly a year ago, as I was basically using it as a place to write down some of the random thoughts that would occur to me during my explorations into the employment market.   (I would always test myself by clicking “Save Draft” instead of “Publish” because I like living on the edge.)  I’ve cleaned it up because I’ve been sharing parts of it with people I know who are on their career paths, and figure it could be of use to others. Of course, this is written by someone who is on the higher education IT leadership track, but it should have some relevance for anyone in the job hunt.

A disclaimer:  I’m not looking for a new job at the moment.  Anything written here is from the perspective of when I was looking for a new job, which was before I had a new job.  I like my new job, a fact about which I’ll elaborate on in a few weeks.

 

Continue reading What I Learned in the Job Search

The first month

I’ve now been an Assistant Vice President and Deputy CIO for just over a month. In some ways, it feels like no time has passed at all.  In other ways, it feels like it’s been forever. Continue reading The first month

When You Know It’s Time

I have just a few weeks left at Drew.  One of the things I keep realizing about this transition is that it’s something I’ve never done before:

 

 

But I had forgotten something when I tweeted this:  As a child, I moved three times before I graduated high school, and my parents moved an additional time right after my graduation, and another time 2 years later while I was in college.  As an adult I have moved to a new domicile 4 or 5 times as well. So I do have some experience with transitions, they’re just more personal than professional.

Every time I’ve moved,  there would always come a point in the move–usually when the movers had packed everything up and the house was filled with nothing but the clutter of the move–when I didn’t want to be there anymore.   There was something about that trigger that made my mind say “Yes, now, it’s time.”

I’m starting to feel that, but it’s not because I’ve physically packed up my office (I’m going to start that soon) but because I’m “packing up” my job. I’m making sure I’m giving things to other people to take on, deliberately not taking on most new things, watching as the organization makes the first steps into doing things without me.  Soon, my job itself will be nothing but a cluttered house, empty except for the pieces that are too unimportant to deal with.

And that is when I will be completely ready to go.

None of this means I won’t miss the place or the people.  Of course I will, and it will be very hard.  But I’m reminded that there’s something about the nature of transitions that readies you for the next step,  just in time for when you need it.